Thank you, He’s setting me free

Edit: And thanks to the popular demand of “1”, we now include an audio track for those who really have to know.

I have not purposely left out the echo, it’s more like the end of the line for the recording studio (time to make lunch for the people.) And figuring out how to get this uploaded.

C                                    G
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for saving me

(Oh thank-you Lord)
G                                        C
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for setting me free
    F         C
(Oh thank-you Lord)
C                             C7
Once I was lost, but now I’m found
F
Now my home is heavenly bound
C                    G               C
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for saving me
    F         C
(Oh thank-you Lord)

C
He’s setting me free (He’s setting me free)
                    G
With his Holy Ghost power (with His Holy Ghost power)
G
He’s setting me free (He’s setting me free)
          C
This very hour (This very hour)

He’s cleansing my soul (He’s cleansing my soul)
       C7       F
and he makes me whole(and he makes me whole)
                C                       G
He’s setting me free, free, free, free, free
                    C               F          C
With his Holy Ghost power (with His Holy Ghost power)

Woke up this morning with this song going through my head, and thought it would be a great addition to some things we’re doing this Sunday.

When I looked it up on the Internet, the words we used “back in the day”™ didn’t match up with anything I could find. I found half of the song (He’s setting me free) as a Praise and Worship from years back but the lyrics didn’t quite match up, and definitely the palangi versions didn’t have the echo/response which makes the song go.

Recalling back,I first heard the song from listening to one of the Fijian youth groups when attending one of the the Uniting Church NCYC in Canberra. There was a camp-group Bible Study or something (in a very large room) and towards the end, for some reason different groups did songs for the fellowship. A Fijian group got up and did this song, with actions and it was quite a powerful message.

Man, I was impressed and clueless. I can only think it was either ‘Unga Takai or his mum Tekemapa that got all the words down and taught Ashfield youth (it could have been someone else, but they’ll have to tell me.)

Sharing and sharing alike, we took that song with us to an NCYC in Adelaide a couple of years later and performed it at the foyer to lunch, the Railway Station, on the road, on the busses.

Thank you, He’s setting me free

C                                    G
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for saving me

(Oh thank-you Lord)
G                                        C
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for setting me free
    F         C
(Oh thank-you Lord)
C                             C7
Once I was lost, but now I’m found
F
Now my home is heavenly bound
C                    G               C
Thank-you, thank-you Lord for saving me
    F         C
(Oh thank-you Lord)

C
He’s setting me free (He’s setting me free)
                    G
With his Holy Ghost power (with His Holy Ghost power)
G
He’s setting me free (He’s setting me free)
          C
This very hour (This very hour)

He’s cleansing my soul (He’s cleansing my soul)
       C7       F
and he makes me whole(and he makes me whole)
                C                       G
He’s setting me free, free, free, free, free
                    C               F          C
With his Holy Ghost power (with His Holy Ghost power)

Woke up this morning with this song going through my head, and thought it would be a great addition to some things we’re doing this Sunday.

When I looked it up on the Internet, the words we used “back in the day”™ didn’t match up with anything I could find. I found half of the song (He’s setting me free) as a Praise and Worship from years back but the lyrics didn’t quite match up, and definitely the palangi versions didn’t have the echo/response which makes the song go.

Recalling back,I first heard the song from listening to one of the Fijian youth groups when attending one of the the Uniting Church NCYC in Canberra. There was a camp-group Bible Study or something (in a very large room) and towards the end, for some reason different groups did songs for the fellowship. A Fijian group got up and did this song, with actions and it was quite a powerful message.

Man, I was impressed and clueless. I can only think it was either ‘Unga Takai or his mum Tekemapa that got all the words down and taught Ashfield youth (it could have been someone else, but they’ll have to tell me.)

Sharing and sharing alike, we took that song with us to an NCYC in Adelaide a couple of years later and performed it at the foyer to lunch, the Railway Station, on the road, on the busses.

May each moment

Well here’s a strange thing. Met up with Heleni with her daughter at the local shops (she’s doing that FOB thing of checking out all the FOBs while trying not to be noticed as a FOB?)

She asked for the lyrics of one of those songs we did back in the day, and here we are. She wanted it SMSd on the phone, which is all nice and dandy but I ain’t gonna re-type the thing if it’s already typed up.

And, I ain’t reformatting it on the phone to get the Guitar chords lined up (it’s hard enough getting it done on the web. Anyhoo, she never got back with an email or other online presence, so if anyone sees a strange Tongan lady tell her the words are here.

Andrae Crouche (?)

C
May each moment, of each hour
                    C7
of each day of your life,
     F                          C
be a picture of love to all the world

And in Jesus, may grow, May you trust him,
                    Am
May you know of his Love,
                      G
And his love may know you.

Chorus

         C
And when soon he shall come
       F
may we all join as one
       C           Am
In the joy that we share
       G                 C
In his glory this is our prayer.

May your father, become real
In your life may you feel
The beauty of love to all the world
And where ever you may go
Tell the people, let them know
that his coming, is so very near.

For many years I thought the song was written by Andrae Crouche, but now with the Internet the only reference I can find for it is through the Heritage Singers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCYK6zG3mKs 

Our youth first came across the song as a translation by one of the mum’s of another youth group (kainga and all that.)

‘Ofa ke Hoko

(w) Ngangatu Fifita

C
‘Ofa ke hoko, ‘a e taimi
                C7
Kotoa ‘e tau mo’ui,
     F                     C
Ko e ‘ata, ‘oe ‘ofa ki mamani.

Ke ‘ia Sisu, Falala ki ai
                Am
‘I he tui kia teia
              G
Tene toe foki mai.

Tau:
C
‘Oka ne ka fotu mai
       F
Ke tau fakataha ai
      C        Am
‘I he fiefia ‘anga
     G                      C
Hono naunau, ko ‘emau lotu ia.

Humm 1st verse, while one voice reads
Sione 3:16

Her kids had a band where this became one of the favoured items they would play and pass along to the youth that followed them.

There’s a few other songs that we caught the Tongan version of before we knew there was a palangi version.

Follow the ‘sound’ on Youtube and see if you can capture the Tongan version along the way.

When running hot water isn’t an option

So, what can we do about cleaning in the evening when there’s no running hot water in the house?

We’re visiting family and friends in Tonga and although the place is nice and warm (for their winter) that water from the water tank can be down right cold when you need to submerge in it to get clean.

I’ve had many friends come up with an amazing range of ideas for how to warm up the shower experience in the evening. Sesilia and Sione demonstrate the oldest way known to bath during winter.

2014-07-11 0892014-07-11 091

Use a bucket.

You shouldn’t need to read any further, but they don’t actually suggest you get into the bucket.That’s silly Eye rolling smile

How good is your tongue

We have contrasting reading styles with our kids, and there was some concern about the progress of one of the younger ones, but there some odd issues.

Sesilia doesn’t seem to be reaching the same reading levels as her siblings. It’s a fight to get her to read, and when we read she wanders through her page slowly. She’s comfortable with her phonics and we’ve been drilling phonics for years in this household.

Oddly, she also spends a lot of time looking at each page as she’s reading, which is the same behaviour her two brothers showed. The boys reading levels, comprehension are very high. What’s going on in that head?

Phonics has it’s place in education, but it’s always good to remember that it’s just another tool. When the student fails to progress, maybe it’s time to review the appropriateness of the tool for the student, instead of “judging” the student. Remember that the student/child is the important thing, not the system or methodology.

Study finds potential flaw in reading instruction to Spanish-speaking students in US

What works for teaching students to read in English may be unnecessary for beginning readers in Spanish, Stanford professor says.

… by the end of second grade, a striking shift had occurred. Although the Mexican students continued to score lower than U.S. students — again, even those instructed in English — on phonemic awareness, the Mexican students had caught up to or surpassed the U.S. students in what truly mattered: reading achievement.

Inserted from <https://ed.stanford.edu/node/2377?utm_source=intelligencer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=february-2014>

Language and culture continue to be an important discussion point for expatriots, FOBs etc.

This is another interesting data-point for raising culture and language with our kids.

At the football

‘Ofa took Friday afternoon away from the cleaning jobs, to hang out with the boys and they tripped to the local football (rugby union) tournament. The finals between the Tupou College Old Boys team and Marist Bros team. The two teams have been combative and close through out the various tournaments this year and there were no favourites, going into the finals.

 2011-12-23-Football-002

Seluini and Sisitoutai were definitely in the spirit with their blue gear, and Sisitoutai went the extra mile (like his Grandma Fe) and had a bright blue hat on top that is noticeable to everyone.

 2011-12-23-Football-003

Of course, dressed in blue we were a little one-sided in our support.

Uncle Semisi (‘Ofa’s brother and Seluini’s dad) is coach of the Old Boys and Seluini was the sand boy runner (although these days it’s called a “kicking T”).

 2011-12-23-Football-005

Unfortunately, the Marist team weren’t accommodating to our aspirations. They went ahead and stole the show (they won.)

 2011-12-27-Apifoou-Celebrations-160

It was a good hang out to be with family and friends, shouting at other family and friends (both in support and fun derision.)

We drowned our sorrows in bitter water.

Efiafi kata mohe a ‘eni

Author: Unknown

1. Efiafi kata mohe a ‘eni
kata langa ‘eva kei hengihengi
tolia he nukonuka keke tu’u sei
motufihivalu hao mapalei

2. Nusi faifio hono ‘oketi
lipine ‘i tu’a-ki-fa-lelei
kata hifo ki he fanga ‘ufilei
fanifo ‘anga e fine taukei

3. ‘Isa hoto pule’oto oloveti
ne lufilufi’i mo fakalekesi
laukau he ko e fine pele’i
‘ikai ha taha tene toe ‘eke’i

Tau.
Laka keta o(2x)
ki he heke ‘o ‘eva keta sealue(2x)
mo ‘ai’ai lea
he ko e fefine ‘o e vai ko lelea
kukuvalu tangi he mapu-‘a-vaea.

Lao fakaangaanga – Procurement Bill

Government has announced, and published through their website http://www.tonga-now.to the following:

Lao fakaangaanga – Procurement Bill
Policy Decision for the Draft Public Procurement Bill
Purpose: The purpose of this Bill: – legislation and regulation governing the Government Procurement process 

A BILL FOR AN ACT TO PROVIDE A LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR PUBLIC PROCUREMENT IN TONGA AND TO PROVIDE FOR OTHER RELATED MATTERS

Interestingly enough, this has a partial IT solution (or at least the mechanisms of IT assist in providing efficient solutions.) Obviously. Which brings me to some other IT news I’d read through the ether.

Talking eProcurement with Dave Stephens

Some weeks back I ran across an interesting open source company while I was surfing through various IT related blogs. I’ll typically stumble across or hear about at least one or two new open source efforts per week just during the course of reading, surfing/browsing, talking to others involved with the IT industry. However, when I happened upon Coupa, for the first time in a while I couldn’t name one other open source participant in their market (eProcurement). With my curiosity piqued, I contacted the Coupa team and set up an [email] interview with the company’s President & Co-Founder, Dave Stephens. Despite his hectic schedule, Dave was kind enough to provide me with a group of high-quality, information packed answers. Read the entire interview below:

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your background?

I worked at Oracle in the Procurement Applications group for just under 10 years. I joined as an Engineer in February of 1996. By 2002 I was running the organization as Vice President. Within 3 years, despite the .com bust, we were growing the business 7 times faster than the market. It was a blast.
Prior to Oracle I worked at a small engineering consultancy, implementing quality and process control systems for manufacturers. I hold a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from UC Berkeley. On a personal note, aside from a 4-year stint in Houston, I am a California guy.

Q: How did the idea for Coupa form, and when did you decide to form a company around the original idea?

After Oracle’s acquisition of Peoplesoft I was asked to lead Oracle’s CRM Applications group. This was pre-Siebel of course. In that role I studied companies like Salesforce and Sugar. And Sugar’s business model really got me thinking about the potential of open source to break into enterprise applications.
Meanwhile I was growing pretty frustrated with the pace of innovation and progress at Oracle. I caught the start-up bug and left in November of 2005 without a very clear idea of what I would do. I knew I wanted to build an ERP software business that would delight its customers and innovate quickly – and that was about it.
Naturally, Procurement was the area within ERP I had the most depth of experience in and passion for. Plus, I thought it was being underserved. Most best-of-breed vendors were still “hunting elephants” and relying on business plans that called for $1MM average deal sizes. They weren’t better-faster-cheaper plays – they were advanced functionality, niche plays. And it wasn’t working.
So I started working on a business plan for a Procurement play where we’d not only have a highly differentiated product but we’d also provide the lowest TCO. And open source was integral in making the whole thing work.

By February of 2006 we were ready to found Coupa and be off to the races. And the rest is history.